test
Search publications, data, projects and authors
‘The gang Straights impose their anomalies’: three feminist stories to undermine the norm (Rochefort, Wittig, Yvon)

Articles

<10.4000/trans.5211>
KeywordsTriple Keywords
Subject (Philosophy)
Political power
Empowerment (Social sciences)
Power (Social sciences)
Volition
Conation
Will
Incongruence
Incongruity
Worth
Values
Axiology
Correspondence
Letters
Ideology
Dramatic works
Drama--Philosophy
Drama, Modern
Playscripts
Dramas
Drama
Stage
Plays
Concepts
Concept formation
Experience
Utopias
States, Ideal
Utopian literature
Ideal states
Literature
World literature
Western literature (Western countries)
Belles-lettres
Heuristic
Novellas (Short novels)
Stories
Metafiction
Fiction
Novels
Fiction--Philosophy
Franchise
Elections
Polls
Electoral politics
Graphemic analysis
Graphemics
Ethics, Primitive
Science, Moral
Ethics
Deontology
Morality
Philosophy, Moral
Ethology
Moral philosophy
Morals

Abstract

This article provides an analysis of the literary anomaly as reflected in three feminist texts published at the beginning of the 1970s in France and Quebec (Archaos or Christiane Rochefort’s sparing garden, 1972; The Monique Wittig lesbian Corps, 1973; Josée Yvon’s bands, 1976). The anomaly is both the subject of the writing and the formal expression of the question it raises: you are talking about and experimenting with it directly, and comparing readers with hybrid texts that cannot be captured in any stable literary or ideological norm. In Christiane Rochefort’s anarchist, joyous and kidnapped utopian parody, the introduction of anarchy has a telling power: women discover what rape is, which turns out to be a monosity that women will be able to start challenging and refusing. In The lesbian Corps, a collection of fragments in love halfway between the erotic narrative and the horrific narrative, the literary inscription of lesbianism and women’s bodies, and in particular the organic body, is laid out from the outset as an incongruity with the traditional barrel: this is both an anomaly — a literary hapax — and an abnormal one, not only unexpected but in principle rejected by the conventional values and taste of the letters. In the text by Josée Yvon, a long nervous poem on women’s violence, the choice of aggressive writing and a revolutionary terrorist ideology also questioned ‘the other’ of the normal, moral standard — as Wittig will say later too — the ‘straight’. In the three audians, the permanent staging of moral and literary subversion prevents a sense of establishment, ideology from hatching, and writing thus opens up new revolutionary possibilities. The anomaly plays several roles: she asks philosophically about the concepts of norm and anomaly, it has a confrontational power that allows her to reveal the power of social norms that are usually more hidden, and it undermines them by profoundly renewing the political meaning of literary creation.

...loading
Report a bug

Under construction

We're in Beta!

The GoTriple platform is still in Beta and we keep adding new features everyday. Check the project's website to see what's new and subscribe to our Mailing List.