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A dissident flâneuse in pharmacopornomegalopolis. Promiscuity, love and city in JÓSE Sbarra cruel plastic

Articles

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Disciplines
KeywordsTriple Keywords
Poetry--Philosophy
Poems
Poetry
Verses (Poetry)
Ontology
Being
Context (Linguistics)
Grammar, Comparative and general--Context
Situation (Linguistics)
Identity
Identity (Philosophical concept)
Exchange
Political opposition
Opposition (Political science)
Subject (Philosophy)

Abstract

Summary This article addresses the study of one of the literary authors of the nineties most attracted and less studied by the critic, José Sbarra, based on his best-known novelty, cruel plastic, in 1992. I am mainly based on the figure of one of its protagonists, Bombón, prostituta travesti, which is self-described as ‘puta y poeta’, to investigate how an alleged opposition that establishes different status, a high one for poetry and a degraded one for sexuality and materiality, is being broken, leading to a de-escalation of poetry as well as bodily areas and urban areas of what Paul B. Preciado calls pharmacopornomegalopolis. Bombon thus becomes a remarkable feature of modern flâneur in the context of the establishment of a gay identity which, according to Perlongher, by attempting to extend the scope of normality to the edges of human beings to new people excluded, such as the travesti, the loca or the chongo. In turn, in the novel of Sbarra we can also consider questioning the naturalisation of the body from the natural/artificial binomium. Hegemonic bodies in relation to cisheteronorm are thus denatured. In that sense, it is Bombón’s character who, from an abjected position, is established as a desired person (rather than as an object of desire or commercial exchange). The promiscuity thus results in an agenciation of the body itself and an unveiling that love and family are strong bodily disciplining devices. With a fragmentary and polyphonic style that shifts from the lyric to the narrative, always in an ironic tone that is now absurd, Sbarra’s novelty is a major challenge to the standards of the traditional family and to the nascent normalisation of the gay.

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