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Decolonisation is not a metaphor

Articles

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KeywordsTriple Keywords
Use of land
Utilization of land
Land use
Land
Land utilization
Number concept
Thought and thinking
Thoughts
Thinking
Mind
Justice
Injustice
Imperialism
Neocolonialism
Colonialism
Expansion (United States politics)
Empires
Global politics
International politics
Political history
World politics
Triads (Sociology)
Reality
Ethics, Primitive
Science, Moral
Ethics
Deontology
Morality
Philosophy, Moral
Ethology
Moral philosophy
Morals

Abstract

Summary: Our aim in this article is to remind readers of the concern about decolonisation. Decolonisation brings with it the repatriation of land and Indigenous life; it is not a metaphor of other things we want to do to improve our societies. The easy adoption of decolonising discourse evidenced by the increasing number of people called to ‘decolonise our schools’, or to use ‘decolonising methods’ or ‘decolonising thinking’, makes decolonisation a metaphor. However important its goals are, social justice, critical methodologies or approaches that decentralise the prospects of the coloniser have objectives that can be immeasurable with decolonisation. Due to the fact that settlement colonialism is built on a triad structure encased with slave colono- native-slave, the decolonial wishes of white, non-white, immigrant, post-colonial and oprimid people can similarly enshrine in resettlement, re-occupation and reintegration which, in reality, promote settlement colonialism. The metaforisation of decolonisation makes it possible to evade or ‘move from settlers to innocence’, which attempt to reconcile in a problematic way the guilt and complicity of settlers, and to rescue the future of settlers. In this article, we analyse multiple settler movements towards innocence in order to promote ‘an ethics of imconsurability’ that recognises what is different and what is sovereign for decolonisation projects in relation to social justice projects based on human and civil rights. We also point to worrying issues within the transnational/third world decolonisation, abolition and critical pedagogies of space and place, which challenge the coalescence of social justice efforts, leading to more significant potential alliances.

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